Material Components (MDC) help developers implement Material Design. Created by a team of engineers and UX designers at Google, MDC features dozens of beautiful and functional UI components and is available for Android, iOS, web and Flutter.

material.io/develop

In codelab MDC-101, you used two Material Components (MDC) to build a login page: text fields and buttons with ink ripples. Now let's expand upon this foundation by adding navigation, structure, and data.

What you'll build

In this codelab, you'll build a home screen for an app called Shrine, an e-commerce app that sells clothing and home goods. It will contain:

MDC-Android components in this codelab

What you'll need

How would you rate your level of experience building Android apps?

Novice Intermediate Proficient

Continuing from MDC-101?

If you completed MDC-101, your code should be prepared for this codelab. Skip to step 3: Add a top app bar.

Starting from scratch?

Download the starter codelab app

Download starter app

The starter app is located in the material-components-android-codelabs-102-starter/java directory. Be sure to cd into that directory before beginning.

...or clone it from GitHub

To clone this codelab from GitHub, run the following commands:

git clone https://github.com/material-components/material-components-android-codelabs
cd material-components-android-codelabs/
git checkout 102-starter

Load the starter code in Android Studio

  1. Once the setup wizard finishes and the Welcome to Android Studio window is shown, click Open an existing Android Studio project. Navigate to the directory where you had installed the sample code, and select java -> shrine (or search your computer for shrine) to open the Shrine project.
  2. Wait a moment for Android Studio to build and sync the project, as shown by activity indicators along the bottom of the Android Studio window.
  3. At this point, Android Studio might raise some build errors because you are missing the Android SDK or build tools, such as the one shown below. Follow the instructions in Android Studio to install/update these and sync your project.

Add project dependencies

The project needs a dependency on the MDC Android support library. The sample code you downloaded should already have this dependency listed, but it is good practice to do the following steps to make sure.

  1. Navigate to the app module's build.gradle file and make sure that the dependencies block includes a dependency on MDC Android:
api 'com.android.support:design:28.0.0-alpha1'
  1. (Optional) If necessary, edit the build.gradle file to add that dependency and sync the project.

Run the starter app

  1. Ensure that the build configuration to the left of the Run / Play button is app.
  2. Press the green Run / Play button to build and run the app.
  3. In the Select Deployment Target window, if you already have an Android device listed in your available devices, skip to Step 8. Otherwise, click Create New Virtual Device.
  4. In the Select Hardware screen, select a phone device, such as Pixel 2, and then click Next.
  5. In the System Image screen, select a recent Android version, preferably the highest API level. If it is not installed, click the Download link that is shown and complete the download.
  6. Click Next.
  7. On the Android Virtual Device (AVD) screen, leave the settings as they are and click Finish.
  8. Select an Android device from the deployment target dialog.
  9. Click Ok.
  10. Android Studio builds the app, deploys it, and automatically opens it on the target device.

Success! You should see the Shrine login page from the MDC-101 codelab.

Now that the login screen is looking good, let's populate the app with some products.

The home screen is revealed when the login page is dismissed, with a screen that says "You did it!". That's great! But now our user has no actions to take, or any sense of where they are in the app. To help with that, let's add navigation.

Material Design offers navigation patterns that ensure a high degree of usability. One of the most notable navigation components is a top app bar.

To provide navigation and give users quick access to other actions, let's add a top app bar.

Add an AppBar widget

In shr_product_grid_fragment.xml, delete the <LinearLayout> tag containing the "You did it!" TextView and replace it with the following:

shr_product_grid_fragment.xml

<android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="wrap_content">

   <android.support.v7.widget.Toolbar
       android:id="@+id/app_bar"
       style="@style/Widget.Shrine.Toolbar"
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="?attr/actionBarSize"
       app:title="@string/shr_app_name" />
</android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout>

Your shr_product_grid_fragment.xml should look as follows:

shr_product_grid_fragment.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
   xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="match_parent"
   tools:context=".ProductGridFragment">

   <android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="wrap_content">

       <android.support.v7.widget.Toolbar
           android:id="@+id/app_bar"
           style="@style/Widget.Shrine.Toolbar"
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="?attr/actionBarSize"
           app:title="@string/shr_app_name" />
   </android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout>
  
</FrameLayout>

Many app bars have a button next to the title. Let's add a menu icon to ours.

Add a navigation icon

While still in shr_product_grid_fragment.xml, add the following to the Toolbar XML component (which you just added to your layout):

shr_product_grid_fragment.xml

app:navigationIcon="@drawable/shr_menu"

Your shr_product_grid_fragment.xml should look as follows:

shr_product_grid_fragment.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
   xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="match_parent"
   tools:context=".ProductGridFragment">
  
   <android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="wrap_content">

       <android.support.v7.widget.Toolbar
           android:id="@+id/app_bar"
           style="@style/Widget.Shrine.Toolbar"
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="?attr/actionBarSize"
           app:navigationIcon="@drawable/shr_menu"
           app:title="@string/shr_app_name" />
   </android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout>
  
</FrameLayout>

Add action buttons and style the top app bar

You can also add buttons to the end side of the app bar. In Android, these are called action buttons.

We'll style the top app bar and add action buttons to its menu programmatically.

First, let's create a method to set up the toolbar. The method should get a reference to the toolbar using its id, get a reference to the activity using getActivity(). If the activity isn't null, set the Toolbar to be used as an ActionBar using setSupportActionBar:

ProductGridFragment.java

private void setUpToolbar(View view) {
   Toolbar toolbar = view.findViewById(R.id.app_bar);
   AppCompatActivity activity = (AppCompatActivity) getActivity();
   if (activity != null) {
       activity.setSupportActionBar(toolbar);
   }
}

Next, directly underneath the setUpToolbar method we just added, let's override onCreateOptionsMenu to inflate the contents of shr_toolbar_menu.xml into the toolbar:

ProductGridFragment.java

@Override
public void onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu, MenuInflater menuInflater) {
   menuInflater.inflate(R.menu.shr_toolbar_menu, menu);
   super.onCreateOptionsMenu(menu, menuInflater);
}

Now add a call to the setUpToolbar method we added to the content of the onCreateView() method with the following. Your onCreateView method should now look something like this:

ProductGridFragment.java

@Override
public View onCreateView(
       @NonNull LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
   // Inflate the layout for this fragment with the ProductGrid theme
   View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.shr_product_grid_fragment, container, false);

   // Set up the toolbar
   setUpToolbar(view);

   return view;
}

One more thing: add an onCreate() method to ProductGridFragment.java, and in the method body, call setHasOptionMenu with true. The method should look like this:

ProductGridFragment.java

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
   super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
   setHasOptionsMenu(true);
}

The above code snippets set the app bar from our XML layout to be the Action Bar for this activity. onCreateOptionsMenu is a callback to tell the activity what to use as our menu. In this case, it will put the menu items from R.menu.shr_toolbar_menu into the app bar. The menu file contains two items: "Search" and "Filter".

shr_toolbar_menu.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<menu xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto">
   <item
       android:id="@+id/search"
       android:icon="@drawable/shr_search"
       android:title="@string/shr_search_title"
       app:showAsAction="always" />
   <item
       android:id="@+id/filter"
       android:icon="@drawable/shr_filter"
       android:title="@string/shr_filter_title"
       app:showAsAction="always" />
</menu>

After those changes, your ProductGridFragment.java file should look as follows:

ProductGridFragment.java

package com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine;

import android.os.Bundle;
import android.support.annotation.NonNull;
import android.support.v4.app.Fragment;
import android.support.v7.app.AppCompatActivity;
import android.support.v7.widget.Toolbar;
import android.view.LayoutInflater;
import android.view.Menu;
import android.view.MenuInflater;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.ViewGroup;

public class ProductGridFragment extends Fragment {

   @Override
   public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
       super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
       setHasOptionsMenu(true);
   }
  
   @Override
   public View onCreateView(
           @NonNull LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
       // Inflate the layout for this fragment with the ProductGrid theme
       View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.shr_product_grid_fragment, container, false);

       // Set up the toolbar
       setUpToolbar(view);

       return view;
   }
  
   private void setUpToolbar(View view) {
       Toolbar toolbar = view.findViewById(R.id.app_bar);
       AppCompatActivity activity = (AppCompatActivity) getActivity();
       if (activity != null) {
           activity.setSupportActionBar(toolbar);
       }
   }

   @Override
   public void onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu, MenuInflater menuInflater) {
       menuInflater.inflate(R.menu.shr_toolbar_menu, menu);
       super.onCreateOptionsMenu(menu, menuInflater);
   }

}

Build and run. Your home screen should look like this:

Now the toolbar has a navigation icon, a title, and two action icons on the right side. The toolbar also displays elevation using a subtle shadow that shows it's on a different layer than the content.

Now that our app has some structure, let's organize the content by placing it in cards.

Add a card

Let's start by adding one card underneath the top app bar. A card should have a region for an image, a title, and a label for secondary text. Add the following in shr_product_grid_fragment.xml underneath the AppBarLayout.

shr_product_grid_fragment.xml

<android.support.design.card.MaterialCardView
   android:layout_width="160dp"
   android:layout_height="180dp"
   android:layout_marginBottom="16dp"
   android:layout_marginLeft="16dp"
   android:layout_marginRight="16dp"
   android:layout_marginTop="70dp"
   app:cardBackgroundColor="?attr/colorPrimaryDark"
   app:cardCornerRadius="4dp">

   <LinearLayout
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="wrap_content"
       android:layout_gravity="bottom"
       android:background="#FFFFFF"
       android:orientation="vertical"
       android:padding="8dp">

       <TextView
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="wrap_content"
           android:padding="2dp"
           android:text="@string/shr_product_title"
           android:textAppearance="?attr/textAppearanceHeadline6" />

       <TextView
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="wrap_content"
           android:padding="2dp"
           android:text="@string/shr_product_description"
           android:textAppearance="?attr/textAppearanceBody2" />
   </LinearLayout>
</android.support.design.card.MaterialCardView>

Build and run:

In this preview, you can see the card is inset from the edge, and it has rounded corners and a shadow (which expresses the card's elevation). The entire shape is called the "container." Aside from the container, all of the elements within it are optional. You can add header text, a thumbnail or avatar, subhead text, dividers, and even buttons and icons. The card we just created, for instance, consists of two TextViews in a LinearLayout, aligned to the bottom of the card.

Cards are usually shown in a collection with other cards. In the next section of this codelab, we'll lay them out as a collection in a grid.

When multiple cards are present in a screen, they are grouped together into one or more collections. Cards in a grid are coplanar, meaning they share the same resting elevation as one another (unless picked up or dragged, but we won't be covering that in this codelab).

Set up the grid of cards

Take a look at the shr_product_card.xml file that we've provided for you:

shr_product_card.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<android.support.design.card.MaterialCardView xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="wrap_content"
   app:cardBackgroundColor="@android:color/white"
   app:cardElevation="2dp"
   app:cardPreventCornerOverlap="true">

   <LinearLayout
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="wrap_content"
       android:orientation="vertical">

       <com.android.volley.toolbox.NetworkImageView
           android:id="@+id/product_image"
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="@dimen/shr_product_card_image_height"
           android:background="?attr/colorPrimaryDark"
           android:scaleType="centerCrop" />

       <LinearLayout
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="wrap_content"
           android:orientation="vertical"
           android:padding="16dp">

           <TextView
               android:id="@+id/product_title"
               android:layout_width="match_parent"
               android:layout_height="wrap_content"
               android:text="@string/shr_product_title"
               android:textAppearance="?attr/textAppearanceHeadline6" />

           <TextView
               android:id="@+id/product_price"
               android:layout_width="match_parent"
               android:layout_height="wrap_content"
               android:text="@string/shr_product_description"
               android:textAppearance="?attr/textAppearanceBody2" />
       </LinearLayout>
   </LinearLayout>
</android.support.design.card.MaterialCardView>

The card layout above represents a card with an image (in this case, a NetworkImageView, which allows us to set images it loaded from a URL), and two TextViews.

Next, look at the ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter we've provided for you. It's in the same package as ProductGridFragment.

ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter.java

package com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine;

import android.support.annotation.NonNull;
import android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView;
import android.view.LayoutInflater;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.ViewGroup;

import com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine.network.ImageRequester;
import com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine.network.ProductEntry;

import java.util.List;

/**
* Adapter used to show a simple grid of products.
*/
public class ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<ProductCardViewHolder> {

   private List<ProductEntry> productList;
   private ImageRequester imageRequester;

   ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter(List<ProductEntry> productList) {
       this.productList = productList;
       imageRequester = ImageRequester.getInstance();
   }

   @NonNull
   @Override
   public ProductCardViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(@NonNull ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {
       View layoutView = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(R.layout.shr_product_card, parent, false);
       return new ProductCardViewHolder(layoutView);
   }

   @Override
   public void onBindViewHolder(@NonNull ProductCardViewHolder holder, int position) {
       // TODO: Put ViewHolder binding code here in MDC-102
   }

   @Override
   public int getItemCount() {
       return productList.size();
   }
}

The adapter class above manages the content of our grid. We will soon write the code for onBindViewHolder() to determine what each view should do with its given content.

You can also take a look at ProductCardViewHolder in the same package. This class stores the views we care about from our card layout, so we can modify them later.

ProductCardViewHolder.java

package com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine;

import android.support.annotation.NonNull;
import android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView;
import android.view.View;

public class ProductCardViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

   public ProductCardViewHolder(@NonNull View itemView) {
       super(itemView);
       // TODO: Find and store views from itemView
   }
}

To set up our grid, first we'll want to remove the placeholder MaterialCardView from shr_product_grid_fragment.xml. Next, you should add the component representing our grid of cards. In this case, we will use a RecyclerView. Add the RecyclerView component to your shr_product_grid_fragment.xml below your AppBarLayout XML component:

shr_product_grid_fragment.xml

<android.support.v4.widget.NestedScrollView
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="match_parent"
   android:layout_marginTop="56dp"
   android:background="@color/productGridBackgroundColor"
   android:paddingStart="@dimen/shr_product_grid_spacing"
   android:paddingEnd="@dimen/shr_product_grid_spacing"
   app:layout_behavior="@string/appbar_scrolling_view_behavior">

   <android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView
       android:id="@+id/recycler_view"
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="match_parent" />

</android.support.v4.widget.NestedScrollView>

Your shr_product_grid_fragment.xml should look as follows:

shr_product_grid_fragment.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
   xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="match_parent"
   tools:context=".ProductGridFragment">

   <android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="wrap_content">

       <android.support.v7.widget.Toolbar
           android:id="@+id/app_bar"
           style="@style/Widget.Shrine.Toolbar"
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="?attr/actionBarSize"
           app:navigationIcon="@drawable/shr_menu"
           app:title="@string/shr_app_name" />
   </android.support.design.widget.AppBarLayout>

   <android.support.v4.widget.NestedScrollView
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="match_parent"
       android:layout_marginTop="56dp"
       android:background="@color/productGridBackgroundColor"
       android:paddingStart="@dimen/shr_product_grid_spacing"
       android:paddingEnd="@dimen/shr_product_grid_spacing"
       app:layout_behavior="@string/appbar_scrolling_view_behavior">

       <android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView
           android:id="@+id/recycler_view"
           android:layout_width="match_parent"
           android:layout_height="match_parent" />

   </android.support.v4.widget.NestedScrollView>

</FrameLayout>

Finally, add the RecyclerView initialization code into ProductGridFragment.java in onCreateView() after you call setUpToolbar(view) and before the return statement:

ProductGridFragment.java

@Override
public View onCreateView(
       @NonNull LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
   ...
   setUpToolbar(view);

   // Set up the RecyclerView
   RecyclerView recyclerView = view.findViewById(R.id.recycler_view);
   recyclerView.setHasFixedSize(true);
   recyclerView.setLayoutManager(new GridLayoutManager(getContext(), 2, GridLayoutManager.VERTICAL, false));
   ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter adapter = new ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter(
           ProductEntry.initProductEntryList(getResources()));
   recyclerView.setAdapter(adapter);
   int largePadding = getResources().getDimensionPixelSize(R.dimen.shr_product_grid_spacing);
   int smallPadding = getResources().getDimensionPixelSize(R.dimen.shr_product_grid_spacing_small);
   recyclerView.addItemDecoration(new ProductGridItemDecoration(largePadding, smallPadding));

   return view;
}

The above code snippet contains the necessary initialization steps to set up a RecyclerView. This includes setting the RecyclerView's layout manager and initializing and setting the RecyclerView's adapter.

Your ProductGridFragment.java file should now look as follows:

ProductGridFragment.java

package com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine;

import android.os.Bundle;
import android.support.annotation.NonNull;
import android.support.v4.app.Fragment;
import android.support.v7.app.AppCompatActivity;
import android.support.v7.widget.GridLayoutManager;
import android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView;
import android.support.v7.widget.Toolbar;
import android.view.LayoutInflater;
import android.view.Menu;
import android.view.MenuInflater;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.ViewGroup;

import com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine.network.ProductEntry;

public class ProductGridFragment extends Fragment {

   @Override
   public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
       super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
       setHasOptionsMenu(true);
   }

   @Override
   public View onCreateView(
           @NonNull LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
       // Inflate the layout for this fragment with the ProductGrid theme
       View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.shr_product_grid_fragment, container, false);

       // Set up the toolbar
       setUpToolbar(view);

       // Set up the RecyclerView
       RecyclerView recyclerView = view.findViewById(R.id.recycler_view);
       recyclerView.setHasFixedSize(true);
       recyclerView.setLayoutManager(new GridLayoutManager(getContext(), 2, GridLayoutManager.VERTICAL, false));
       ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter adapter = new ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter(
               ProductEntry.initProductEntryList(getResources()));
       recyclerView.setAdapter(adapter);
       int largePadding = getResources().getDimensionPixelSize(R.dimen.shr_product_grid_spacing);
       int smallPadding = getResources().getDimensionPixelSize(R.dimen.shr_product_grid_spacing_small);
       recyclerView.addItemDecoration(new ProductGridItemDecoration(largePadding, smallPadding));

       return view;
   }

   private void setUpToolbar(View view) {
       Toolbar toolbar = view.findViewById(R.id.app_bar);
       AppCompatActivity activity = (AppCompatActivity) getActivity();
       if (activity != null) {
           activity.setSupportActionBar(toolbar);
       }
   }

   @Override
   public void onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu, MenuInflater menuInflater) {
       menuInflater.inflate(R.menu.shr_toolbar_menu, menu);
       super.onCreateOptionsMenu(menu, menuInflater);
   }

}

Build and run!

The cards are there, but they don't show anything yet. Now's the time to add some product data.

Add images and text

For each card, add an image, product name, and price. Our ViewHolder abstraction holds the views for each card. So, we'll add the three views we care about to our ViewHolder. Update your ViewHolder to look as follows.

ProductCardViewHolder.java

package com.google.codelabs.mdc.java.shrine;

import android.support.annotation.NonNull;
import android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.TextView;

import com.android.volley.toolbox.NetworkImageView;

public class ProductCardViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

   public NetworkImageView productImage;
   public TextView productTitle;
   public TextView productPrice;

   public ProductCardViewHolder(@NonNull View itemView) {
       super(itemView);
       productImage = itemView.findViewById(R.id.product_image);
       productTitle = itemView.findViewById(R.id.product_title);
       productPrice = itemView.findViewById(R.id.product_price);
   }
}

In our RecyclerView's adapter, update the onBindViewHolder() method to set the information on each view in the ViewHolder:

ProductCardRecyclerViewAdapter.java

@Override
public void onBindViewHolder(@NonNull ProductCardViewHolder holder, int position) {
   if (productList != null && position < productList.size()) {
       ProductEntry product = productList.get(position);
       holder.productTitle.setText(product.title);
       holder.productPrice.setText(product.price);
       imageRequester.setImageFromUrl(holder.productImage, product.url);
   }
}

The above snippet tells our RecyclerView's adapter what to do with each card, given a ViewHolder. In this case, it sets the text data on each of the ViewHolder's TextViews, and calls an ImageRequester to get an image from a URL. The ImageRequester is a class we've provided for your convenience, and it uses the Volley library. It's outside the scope of this codelab, but feel free to explore the code on your own.

Build and run:

Our products are now showing up in the app!

Our app has a basic flow that takes the user from the login screen to a home screen, where products can be viewed. In just a few lines of code, we added a top app bar with a title and three buttons, and a grid of cards to present our app's content. Our home screen is now simple and functional, with a basic structure and actionable content.

Next steps

With the top app bar, card, text field, and button, we've now used four core Material Design components from the MDC-Android library! You can explore even more components in the MDC-Android Catalog components in MDC Android.

While it's fully functioning, our app doesn't yet express any particular brand or point of view. In MDC-103: Material Design Theming with Color, Shape, Elevation and Type, we'll customize the style of these components to express a vibrant, modern brand.

I was able to complete this codelab with a reasonable amount of time and effort

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I would like to continue using Material Components in the future

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